Welcome to Ctpath

Who are you people?

Preservations Advocates for Terre Haute consists of people from all walks of life who are concerned with preserving the Terre Haute parcel of land. The members are not professionals and do all this work on a strictly volunteer basis. These people consider this issue important enough to take time out from their busy schedules to donate their time and effort.

What is Terre Haute?

Terre Haute is a parcel of land that consists of over 630 acres of mixed forest and wetlands centered around Bogus Mountain and adjacent to the Eureka reservoir. More importantly though, it is the center of several thousand acres of undisturbed land. To put that in perspective, the Terre Haute property is roughly five times the size of the Bethel school complex. Overall, Bethel is roughly 11,000 acres, so the Terre Haute piece consists of roughly 1/20th of the total land area. While this is not virgin forest, the forested sections are mature, old growth forests that are central to the local ecosystem.

Why is it currently in danger?

There are multitudes of reasons for preserving Terre Haute in its current state. The most important ones are to safeguard the water supply, to provide recreation for local residents, to preserve the rural character of the town, and preserve the local environment. Each of these is discussed in more detail in the subsections below.

Why is preserving this piece of land so important?

There are multitudes of reasons for preserving Terre Haute in its current state. The most important ones are to safeguard the water supply, to provide recreation for local residents, to preserve the rural character of the town, and preserve the local environment. Each of these is discussed in more detail in the subsections below.

Preserving Water Quality

Terre Haute drains into three different watersheds, the most important of which is the Eureka watershed. Bethel draws much of its water from the Eureka Reservoir. Terre Haute also drains into the Norwalk River and Sympaug Brook, which provide water to several other areas downstream.  By removing the buffer from around the Eureka Reservoir, many contaminants could make it into the water.  Run-off from roads could introduce gasoline, tar, oil, salt and many other chemicals.  Run-off from nearby homes could introduce pesticides, herbicides, and household chemicals not to mention all kinds of litter and yard waste.  If developed as a golf course, chemicals from that could easily contaminate the reservoir.  These include herbicides, chemical fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides, and other chemicals used in maintaining turf grass.